SPE London section evening programme meeting – October

Book online

Dear members,

We would like to invite you and your colleagues to the October London Section evening meeting. From 5pm until 8.45 pm there will be lectures on simulating CO2 Injection and Storage in the Cloud; and Drilling Optimisation while Drilling (SPE Distinguished Lecturer).

The event will be held at Imperial College; Royal School of Mines, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BP.  The Royal School of Mines is about 15 minutes’ walk from South Kensington tube station via Exhibition Road and Prince Consort Road.

We are very grateful to OpenGoSim for sponsoring this event. OpenGoSim develops and supports reservoir engineering modules based upon the PFLOTRAN parallel open-source simulation code. These modules focus on advanced modelling of CO2 injection processes, including thermal effects. The use of cloud technology enables powerful parallel computing resources to be accessed, even from a laptop.

Regards
Tim Lines
SPE London Section – Programme Chairman
Email: tim.lines@oilfieldinternational.com

Agenda:
5.00-6.30 pm
Talk 1:    Simulating CO2 Injection and Storage in the Cloud.
Paolo Orsini, OpenGoSim

6.30-7.15 pm
DRINKS AND NETWORKING BUFFET

7.15-8.45 pm
Talk 2:    Drilling Optimization Revisited: How Close are we to Drilling Optimization While Drilling (Dowd)?
Vassilios Kelessidis, SPE Distinguished Lecturer

Venue: The event will be held at  the Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London – see MAP

Directions: Please note the main entrance to the Department is via the Royal School of Mines Building on Prince Consort Road, between 10 and 12 on the campus map

Booking:  All booking must be paid in advance and online please, via Eventbrite.

Email: katespe@aol.com

Cost: £34 for SPE/PESGB/EI members, £44 non-members, £19 unemployed members. Non refundable £5 for students booking by Friday October 25 (£19 after). All tickets have an additional Eventbrite fee.

BEFORE DINNER:
5.00-6.30 pm: Simulating CO2 Injection and Storage in the Cloud.
Paolo Orsini, OpenGoSim
CO2 injection into reservoirs or aquifers involves tracking a highly mobile fluid, potentially over a long period of time. Both the initial injection pattern and the formation and movement of the CO2  plume depend on the details of the geological model. Temperature effects can be included and high-quality models of the CO2-brine PVT behaviour are required. The need for high resolution combined with long simulation timescales make this type of simulation computationally demanding, but the use of cloud technology offers cost-effective and powerful highly-parallel computing resources to solve these problems. Examples are given of effects that can be modelled and of results that can be obtained.

Paolo Orsini is the founder and MD of OpenGoSim.
He has been working on CO2 modelling since 2013, when he also got involved in PFLOTRAN development. After an M.Sc. in mechanical engineering, he acquired a PhD in numerical analysis applied to groundwater. Before OpenGoSim, he worked as consultant in groundwater and CO2 storage projects.

OpenGoSim develops and supports reservoir engineering modules based upon the PFLOTRAN parallel open-source simulation code. These modules focus on advanced modelling of CO2 injection processes, including thermal effects. The use of cloud technology enables powerful parallel computing resources to be accessed, even from a laptop.

AFTER DINNER: Drilling Optimization Revisited: How Close are we to Drilling Optimization While Drilling (Dowd)?
Vassilios Kelessidis, SPE Distinguished Lecturer and Khalifa University of Science and Technology.
Drilling engineers and companies strive towards drilling optimization since the era of drilling, with continuous improvements over the years. Drilling engineers generate big data during drilling campaigns but significant information is hidden.

Big Data Analytics and the much-improved Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning techniques provide excellent opportunities for enhancements of drilling optimization. Now data could be exploited very intelligently and ‘on the fly’. However, all this must be done cautiously and always in combination with appropriately developed physical models to maximize benefits.

For drilling optimization, physical modeling is needed using data to calibrate and tune the models rather than using only data driven models without physics.

We focus on rock-bit interaction as the most significant area for drilling optimization. Physical modeling exploits monitored data and generates responses of the bit. The drilling simulator is tuned to match actual drilling data. Sonic while drilling data provide estimates of rock strength on the fly. An optimization scheme can estimate drilling parameters on the fly for drilling the next segment and communicates them to the driller, giving him the capability to ‘ride’ the bit and guide it safely to target.
Take away Idea: Big data analytics and right modelling can help put the driller on the bit.

Vassilios C. Kelessidis is currently a consultant of drilling engineering. He has worked in Schlumberger for more than 9 years and has served later the academia for 18 years: His last position was Professor & Department Chair at Khalifa University (UAE)  (January 2017-December 2018), and Adjunct Professor at Texas A&M at Qatar (TAMUQ). Previously he was at TAMUQ (2012-2016) and at Technical University of Crete, Greece (2000-2016).

He works on drilling engineering, drilling optimization, rock-bit interaction, evolving the drilling predictive simulator, and on cuttings transport, multiphase flows, drilling hydraulics, drilling fluid development and rheology.
He has published more than 115 journal and conference papers with 1640+ citations. He is co-author in SPE Fundamentals of Drilling Engineering, Ch5 – Drilling Hydraulics. He is Associate Editor in SPE Drilling & Completion since 2016. He has PhD (University of Houston, 1985), M.Sc. (Oregon State University, 1982) and Diploma (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, 1980), all in Chemical Engineering.